🔗 Desirable difficulties — Wikipedia

🔗 Desirable difficulties from Wikipedia > A desirable difficulty is a learning task that requires a considerable but desirable amount of effort, thereby improving long-term performance. The term was first coined by Robert A. Bjork in 1994. As the name suggests, desirable difficulties should be both desirable and difficult. Research suggests that while difficult tasks might slow down learning initially, the long term benefits are greater than with easy tasks. However, to be desirable, the tasks must also be accomplishable.

This concept came up in Range: Why generatlists trumph in a specialized world.